Wednesday, November 30, 2011

Christmas Tree Safety

Trim the Tree Safely
 
Trimming the tree is a traditional holiday pastime. However, if they are not properly cared for, Christmas trees can pose a serious danger. The Home Safety Council offers the following tips to keep in mind when selecting and caring for your Christmas tree this holiday season:

 
  • When buying a live tree, look at the needles. If they are brown or break easily, choose another tree. Test for freshness by bending a few needles in half. If the needles snap in two, the tree is dry - look for a tree with needles that spring back to their original shape.  
  • When you take your tree home, put it in a sturdy, non-tip stand filled with water.
  • Give the tree plenty of water. Dry trees can catch on fire easily.
  • Make sure the tree is at least three feet away from any flame or heat source.
  • Never put candles on or near your tree.  
  • Put your tree near the electrical outlet. Do not block the exit.
  • Before you put the lights on the tree, look at every bulb. If the string of lights does not look perfect, throw the lights away and get new ones.  
  • Lights do not last long. Replace your lights as soon as you see any signs of damage.
  • Look on the box for a mark that says ETL, UL or CSA. This means the lights have been tested for safety.
  • Read the directions. Only use as many strings of lights as it says is safe to use.
  • When decorating indoors, use only those lights listed for indoor use. Unplug all lights, inside and out, before going to bed or leaving home.
  • Safely get rid of your tree when it begins dropping needles. Dried-out trees are flammable. They should not be left inside the home or garage, or placed against the house.  
  • Make sure your home has working smoke alarms and fire extinguishers.
  • Make sure your family knows what to do to get outside safely in a fire. Practice a family fire drill so your family and guests know the plan.

 When finding and caring for your Christmas tree this holiday season, just remember the word "STAR":

 

 

Space: Keep your tree at least three feet away from any heat source or flames such as candles and fireplaces.

 
Turn off the lights when you leave the room or go to sleep.

 
Add water daily to keep your tree from drying out too fast.

 
Replace lights when they are cracked or the wire is frayed. Holiday lights should be replaced about every 3 years. Look for the UL label on the box so you know they have been tested for safety


http://www.homesafetycouncil.org/SafetyGuide/sg_holiday_w002.asp

Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety

 

 
Holiday lights help make the season beautiful. They can also cause home fires. To keep your family safe:

Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety
 

 
Look at each string of lights carefully. If any are cracked or damaged, buy new ones
 

 

Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety
 
When you buy new lights, look at the box for a label that shows they have been tested for safety, such as ETL or UL.
Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety
 
Follow the directions on the box. It will tell you how many strings to use together. As a rule, UL recommends using no more than three standard-size sets of lights together.

 


Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety
 

Hang or mount light strands carefully to avoid damaging the cord's insulation



Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety
 

Do not plug in too many things at one time. Use a surge protector.




  • Unplug all holiday lights when you go to sleep or leave home.
  • Plug outdoor decorations into outlets protected by Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCIs) to prevent shock.

Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical Safety Automatic lighting timers can be used to ensure that lights are not left on by mistake. These are available for both indoor and outdoor use.

 
Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical SafetyDo not put electrical cords under rugs. Try to keep them away from places people walk.

 
Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical SafetyWhen replacing a holiday bulb, be sure to use the correct bulb size (wattage) that is right for the fixture.

 
Home Safety - Tips for Holiday Electrical SafetyUse safety caps to keep children from putting things into electrical receptacles/outlets.

 


Tuesday, November 15, 2011

Rear-Facing – The Facts and the Myths CPS CEUS

Rear-Facing – The Facts and the Myths

Join us for a Webinar on December 8
Space is limited.

Reserve your Webinar seat now at:

https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/574025522

The enhanced protection provided by rear-facing child restraints has been known for years in technical circles, and the body of evidence supporting an extended rear-facing period is growing. Authoritative bodies like the AAP and NHTSA have consistently expanded and reinforced their recommendations for keeping children facing the rear longer with each revision of their positions, and the maximum limits of many child restraint models have followed suit. Nevertheless, most children are faced forward long before they reach those limits, and generalizations about how rear-facing child restraints should be installed and used continue in the advocate arena.

This session looks at the facts about rear-facing child restraints, along with some of the educational issues that need to be updated, corrected and refined. Attendees will receive:

- Awareness of recent research on rear-facing effectiveness

- A better understanding of how rear-facing child restraints perform

- A better understanding of injuries reduced by longer rear-facing use

- A better understanding of child restraint installation and usage techniques that can reduce the need for foam noodles and locking clips

- Awareness of features that may enhance rear-facing protection

Dorel Juvenile Group and Safe Ride News are proud to sponsor this webinar in partnership with Joseph M. Colella, Child Passenger Safety Instructor from Traffic Safety Projects. By participating in this webinar, you are eligible to receive one CEU credit towards your Child Passenger Safety Technician or Instructor certification.

Joe Colella is a nationally respected consultant, speaker, instructor, correspondent and advocate. Since becoming involved in occupant protection advocacy, he has worked on improvement and educational efforts with many national organizations. He was also one of the original certified instructors for the National Standardized CPS Training Program, is a past Chairman of the National CPS Board, and has personally helped with education in 45 states.

Title:
Rear-Facing – The Facts and the Myths

Date:
Thursday, December 8, 2011

Time:
4:00 PM - 5:00 PM EST


After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar.

System Requirements
PC-based attendees
Required: Windows® 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Macintosh®-based attendees
Required: Mac OS® X 10.5 or newer

Monday, November 7, 2011

Home Safety Tips

1. Generator Use If using a generator at home, please be aware of the following safety tips from WMECO, especially that you should never connect the generator to your home’s main electrical panel.

Always:
Use qualified electrician to install a stationary or stand-by emergency generator.

Install a special safety transfer switch, required by the National Electric Code. The switch prevents the generator from back-feeding electricity onto the power lines which could be deadly to unsuspecting workers.

Read and adhere to the manufacturer's instructions for safe operation. Don't cut corners when it comes to safety. Carefully read and observe all instructions in your portable electric generator's owner manual, and always follow state, local, and national fire and electric codes.

Turn off all equipment powered by the generator before shutting down your generator.

Keep children and pets away from portable electric generators at all times.

Always operate generators outdoors to avoid the buildup of deadly carbon monoxide fumes. Just like your automobile, a portable generator uses an internal combustion engine that emits deadly carbon monoxide. Be sure to place the generator where exhaust fumes will not enter the house. Only operate it outdoors in a well-ventilated, dry area, and ensure you have protected it from direct exposure to rain and snow, preferably under a canopy, open shed or carport.

And never:
Connect the generator to your home's main electrical panel. Again, you could be putting your life and that of your family and our workers in jeopardy.

Plug a portable electric generator into a regular household outlet. Plugging a generator into a regular household outlet can energize "dead" power lines and injure neighbors or utility workers.

Overload the generator. Do not operate more appliances and equipment than the output rating of the generator. Overloading your generator can seriously damage your valuable appliances and electronics, so you must prioritize your needs. A portable electric generator should also be used only when necessary, and only to power essential equipment.
For more information visit:

http://www.wmeco.com/Community/Safety/Generators.aspx

https://www.nationalgridus.com/masselectric/storm/safety_generators-1.asp

2. Before Your Power Comes Back

· Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment, including sensitive electronics.
· Turn off or disconnect any appliances (like stoves), equipment or electronics you were using when the power went out. When power comes back on, surges or spikes can damage equipment.
· Leave one light turned on so you’ll know when the power comes back on.
· Do not touch any electrical power lines and keep your family away from them. Report downed power lines to the appropriate officials in your area. Both WMECO and National Grid have online reporting systems.
3. Avoid Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Cases of carbon monoxide poisoning are on the rise due to the use of alternative heat and energy sources. Please be sure you and your families are aware of the following:

· Carbon monoxide, found in combustion fumes, is a colorless, odorless gas that can cause sudden illness and death.
· Sources of carbon monoxide in the home include malfunctioning furnaces, water heaters, ovens, stoves, gas-fired dryers, clogged chimneys, corroded flue pipes, and unvented space heaters. Automobiles left running in attached garages also pose a hazard, even if the garage doors are open.
· CO from these combustion fumes can build up in places that don’t have a good flow of fresh air.
· Common symptoms of CO poisoning: headache, fatigue, nausea and dizziness, vomiting, chest pain and confusion.
· Infants, children and unborn babies are especially vulnerable.

Tips to protect you against CO poisoning:

· Never use a stove for heating.
· Do not use a grill, generator or camping stove inside your home, garage or near a window.
· Never leave a car, SUV, or motorcycle engine running inside a garage, even if the garage door is open.
· Install a CO alarm outside every sleeping area and on every level of your home.
· Place CO alarms at least 15 feet away from every fuel-burning appliance to reduce the number of nuisance alarms.
· Make sure alarms can be heard when you test them and practice an escape plan with your entire family.

If your CO alarm goes off:
· Get everyone out of the house as quickly as possible into fresh air. Then call for help from a neighbor’s home or a cell phone outside of your home.
· If someone is experiencing CO poisoning symptoms, call 911 for medical attention.
· If no one is experiencing symptoms, call the fire department. They will let you know when it is safe to re-enter your home.
· For more information on carbon monoxide, visit www.cdc.gov/Features/TimeChangeCODetectors.

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Booster Seat and Seat Belts Safety for Big Kids On The Way

Regardless of age, all passengers need to be buckled in. Follow specific guidelines for your child’s height, age and weight to determine the best child safety restraint. For children ages 5 to 9, who are under 4 feet 9 inches tall and less than 80 to 100 pounds, a car seat or booster seat is a must for the best protection.


Top Booster Seat and Seat Belt Safety Tips
  • Use a car seat with a harness or booster seat with the vehicle lap AND shoulder safety belts until your child passes the Safety Belt Fit Test.
  • Vehicle seat belts are designed to fit an average-sized adult. To get the best protection from a seat belt, children usually need a booster until they are about 4 feet 9 inches tall and weigh between 80 and 100 pounds. Many children will be between 8 and 12 years of age before they meet these height and weight requirements.  
  • Use a booster seat correctly in a back seat every time your child rides in a car.  
  • Older kids get weighed and measured less often than babies, so check your child’s growth a few times a year.
  • Be sure to correctly install your car seat or booster seat. Booster seats are not installed the same way car seats are. Booster seats sit on the vehicle seat and are used to properly position the adult seat belt for an older child.
  • A booster seat uses no harness. It uses the vehicle’s lap AND shoulder belts only. Be sure the seat belt is properly buckled.  
  • For children who are riding in booster seats, never place the shoulder belt under the child's arm or behind the child's back.  
  • Be sure all occupants wear safety belts correctly every time. Children learn from adult role models.  
  • Tell all drivers who transport your child that a car seat or booster seat use is a must when your child is in their vehicles.
  • Treat seat belts as you would any cord or rope. Do not allow children to play with them at any time.
  • When your child reaches 4 feet 9 inches and between 80 to 100 pounds, use the Safety Belt Fit Test to determine if the child is big enough to use the adult seat belt without a booster. Use the Safety Belt Fit Test on every child under 13.

 The Safety Belt Fit Test
 
Have your child sit in a back seat with his or her bottom and back against the vehicle’s seat back. Do the child’s knees bend at the seat’s edge?
  • If yes, go on.
  • If not, the child must stay in a booster seat.

 Buckle the seat belt. Does the lap belt stay low on the hips or high on the thigh?

  •  If yes, go on.
  • If it rests on the soft part of the stomach, the child must stay in a booster seat.

 Look at the shoulder belt. Does it lie on the collarbone and shoulder?
  • If yes, go on.
  • If it is on the face or neck, the child must remain in a booster seat.

Never put the shoulder belt under the child’s arm or behind the child’s back. Do not allow children to play with the shoulder portion of a seat belt. Treat it like any cord.



Can the child maintain the correct seating position with the shoulder belt on the shoulder and the lap belt low across the hips, or high on the thighs?

  • If yes, the child has passed the Safety Belt Fit Test.
  • If no, the child should return to a booster seat and re-test in a month

Magda Rodríguez

Safe Kids of Western Massachusetts
Baystate Children's Hospital
50 Maple Street
Springfield, MA 01103
413-794-6510
Fax: 413-794-6510
magda.rodriguez@baystatehealth.org
http://safekidswmass.blogspot.com/





New Statement on Booster Seat Use

Statement regarding booster seat ratings issued by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS)


It may be attributed to Torine Creppy, Executive Director of Safe Kids Worldwide

October 13, 2011
Injury risks are reduced by 59 percent for children using belt positioning booster seats as compared to seat belts alone. However, there is no "one size fits all" product available to fit children of various height, weight and age. Only a parent of caregiver can make that fit assessment for their child, in their car and in the booster seat.

Parents looking for help to fit their booster seats can find a certified child passenger safety technician to make sure their seat is properly installed.

For a proper booster seat fit, seat belts, once routed through the booster seat guides, should lay on the shoulder or collar bone. The lap belt should lie across the hips or upper thighs. The child should be able to maintain that proper belt fit for the duration of the trip. If the child is unable to do that, they should return to a child safety seat with a harness.

Safe Kids thanks the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) for continuing to push the envelope of product design – but the crucial element for child safety remains for parents and caregivers to properly adjust the booster seat settings to fit their individual child.

Local Contact

Magda Rodríguez

Safe Kids of Western Massachusetts
Baystate Children's Hospital
50 Maple Street
Springfield, MA 01103
413-794-6510
Fax: 413-794-6510
magda.rodriguez@baystatehealth.org
http://safekidswmass.blogspot.com/

Media Contact

Katherine Collins
Public Relations Associate
kcollins@safekids.org
202-662-4476

Monday, October 17, 2011

October is Fire Prevention Month

October is Fire Prevention Month. In addition to supporting the the National Fire Protection Association’s National Fire Prevention Week theme “Protect Your Family from Fire,” Safe Kids is working to raise awareness on fire safety all month long.
On average, 436 children die in home fires every year. Working smoke alarms are an essential piece of safety equipment which should be in every home. If your family lives in a home with working smoke alarms the likelihood of dying in a fire is half that compared to a home without working alarms.



Use the tips below to learn how to keep your family safe from fire.


Top tips for smoke alarms

Put a smoke alarm on every level of your home, outside each sleeping area, and in every bedroom.

Smoke alarms can be battery-operated or electrically hardwired in your home and are available at a variety of price points.

If you have hearing problems, use alarms with flashing strobe lights and vibration.

Test smoke alarms every month. Replace batteries once a year, even if alarms are hardwired.

Test your smoke alarms at night to see if your child will wake up and respond to the alarm. Children sleep more deeply and may not wake up. If your child does not wake up to the alarm, try an alarm where you can program your voice to alert him or her.

Mount smoke alarms high on walls or ceilings since smoke rises. Ceiling-mounted alarms should be installed at least 4 inches away from the nearest wall. Wall-mounted alarms should be installed 4 to 12 inches away from the ceiling.

Replace all smoke alarms every 10 years.

Consider installing both ionization alarms, which are better at sensing flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms, which are better at sensing slow, smoky fires, or dual sensor alarms.

Safe Trick or Treat Event Holyoke Fire Department.



Car Seat Checkup Event, October 24,2011


Care Seat Checkup Event, October 20th

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

Product Recalls for September 2011

While all recalls are important, Safe Kids urges you to pay particular attention to the ones in red, as they are associated with one or more child deaths.

9/1/2011 – Wooden Rattle Recalled by Manhattan Group Due to Choking Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11316.html


9/2/2011 – LED Night Lights Recalled by Camsing Global Due to Burn Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11318.html


9/8/2011 – Dolls Recalled by Pottery Barn Kids Due To Strangulation Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11321.html


9/13/2011 – Weehoo Recalls Bike Trailers Due to Fall and Crash Hazards
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11323.html


9/20/2011 – American Woodcrafters Recalls to Repair Bunk Beds Due To Fall Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11329.html


9/28/2011 – Little Tikes Expands Recall of Toy Workshop and Tool Sets Due to Choking Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11334.html


9/29/2011 – Musical Wooden Table Toys Recalled by Battat Due to Choking Hazard
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11342.html


9/29/2011 – Shermag Recalls to Repair Drop-Side Cribs Due to Entrapment, Suffocation and Fall Hazards
http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml11/11343.html

Brighwood Kids Walk to School

Magda Rodriguez, co-coordinator, Western Mass. Safe Kids headquartered at Baystate Children’s Hospital, was interviewed by WWLP 22News yesterday as part of their coverage of “Walk To School Day.” ABC40 also covered the event.




http://www.wwlp.com/dpp/news/local/hampden/%22walk-to-school-day%22-promotes-safety?ref=scroller&categoryId=10011&status=true

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Playing sports is one of the best ways to keep kids active, healthy and happy. Sport Safety Guide

We also know that for children, being a part of a team and playing sports can help build self-esteem and social skills. But playing sports also means risk of injuries. In fact, each year more than 3.5 million children and adolescents sustain a sport-related injury that requires medical attention.

Athletic Injuries can be mild such as ankle sprains and muscle strains but playing sports creates risk for more severe injuries too, such as concussions or heat illness. Experts say that many sports-related injuries occurring in games and practices are likely preventable. So how do keep young athletes active, healthy—and safe?
Learn what you need to know to keep your kids safe when playing sports:

Pre-participation Physical Evaluations Make sure your child receives an annual physical screening before playing sports.

PPEs help identity any underlying conditions young athletes may have and help parents, coaches and doctors make more informed decisions about physical activity and competitive play of their athlete.

Parents need to talk to their child’s doctor and ask them to perform the full pre-participation evaluation, updated and recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Concussion Prevention, Recognition and Response About 90 percent of concussions occur without the loss of consciousness so knowing the signs and symptoms of a concussion is crucial as a parent.

Concussions are a brain injury. This occurs when a bump, blow or jolt to the head changes the way the brain normally works. Approximately half of all “second impact syndrome” incidents –caused from a hasty return to play after suffering the initial concussion – result in death.

Acute and Overuse Injury Prevention
As a parent, learn about the causes of overuse and acute injuries and what you can do to help avoid them.

Acute injuries are common types of sport-related injuries such as sprains (mostly ankle), muscle strains, bone or growth plate injuries and heat-related illness. Repetitive strain, or “micro-trauma,” to the tendons, bones, and joints are what cause overuse injuries such as “little league elbow” and stress fractures. Risks of overuse injuries are more severe in children than adults as growing bones of a young athlete cannot handle as much stress.
Heat Illness Prevention
Children are often dehydrated before symptoms appear so as a parent, encouraging your kids to hydrate before, during and after play is critical.

Dehydration, a form of heat illness, is the excessive loss of fluids from the body. Dehydration not only hurts performance but can put a child at risk of a more serious heat-related illness, such as heat exhaustion or, heat stroke.







Monday, July 25, 2011

Top Tips for Safe Travels


Nothing says summer like a vacation. Whether you are driving to the beach, flying to Grandma’s house, or touring nearby sites, there are certain things to keep in mind in creating a safe experience for your youngest travelers. It’s about taking some simple steps in preparing for your trip so you can relax and enjoy your final destination.


 
Preparing for Travel

Before leaving home, discuss travel rules and emergency contact information with older children.
If your travels include an extended stay at the home of a friend or relative, discuss the importance of creating a safe environment for your children with your host. Provide advice about installing safety devices in the home, such as outlet covers, safety gates, portable monitors, cabinet locks and a self-closing and self-latching gate around home swimming pools to prevent injuries during your stay.
Memorize the poison control hotline number: 800-222-1222. This toll-free number will connect you from anywhere in the United States to the local poison control center.

 
In a Car
  • Never leave a child alone in the car, even if it’s just to run a quick errand, and always lock unattended vehicles.  
  • Plan to travel with your child’s car safety seat. You will need it to and from the airport and when you arrive at your destination. Do not rent a car safety seat as you will have little or no knowledge of its past crash history.  
  • Before hitting the road, secure all loose items in the car that may become projectiles during a sudden stop or crash.
  • Curious kids love to touch anything they can get their hands on. Engage child safety locks while the vehicle is in motion.
  • Driving and childcare cannot occur at the same time. Should your baby need attention pull over and stop the car first, then care for your baby.
On a Plane
  • Holding a child on an adult’s lap is not the safest option. Whenever possible, buy a child his or her own seat to ensure an approved car seat can be used. Most airlines offer a discount for children under the age of 2.
  • Infants and toddlers on airplanes are safest in a car seat with a harness. A child who rides in a car seat on the ground should ride in that car seat on a plane. Make sure your child’s car seat is labeled 'certified for use in motor vehicles and aircraft.' However, when purchasing the ticket, keep in mind that car seats are not allowed in exit rows and must be installed at a window seat.
  • Children who have outgrown car seats should sit directly on the airplane seat and, like all passengers, keep the lap belt buckled across their thighs or hips. Booster seats are not allowed on airplanes, because they require shoulder belts and airplane seats have only lap belts.
At a Hotel
  • The safest place for your baby to sleep is in a safety-approved crib with a firm mattress and a well-fitting sheet. Cradles and bassinets may be used, but choose those that are certified by the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association (JPMA) for safety. Put your baby to sleep on his/her back, facing up.
  • Bring your own folding playpen, instead of relying on borrowed cribs. If you must use a hotel’s crib, inspect it carefully for broken or missing parts and look up the model on www.Recalls.gov to make sure it isn’t subject to any safety notices.
  • Do not place pillows, soft bedding, toys or anything in your baby’s crib.
  • Babies should never share a bed with a sibling or parent(s) or sleep on couches, chairs, regular beds or any other soft surfaces.

 

 

 

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Drowning is the Leading Cause of Accidental Death Among Children Ages 1- 4

Safe Kids Reminds Parents to Keep Watchful Eye on Children around Water


Nearly 750 children ages 14 and under died in 2007 in the U.S. due to an unintentional drowning. In addition, in 2009 there was an estimated 5,016 children injured due to a near drowning incident. Since Memorial Day, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported that there have been 48 child drownings and 75 near-drownings in pools and spas alone in 35 states and territories as reported by the media.

“A child in or near water can get into trouble in a matter of seconds,” said Meri-K Appy, president of Safe Kids USA. “Safe Kids promotes ‘Lock, Look, and Learn,’ to help remind parents and caregivers that layers of protection help keep children safe, such as using barriers, fences, and anti-entrapment devices for home pools and spas, actively supervising your children, learning how to swim and enrolling your children in swimming, and knowing basic water rescue skills, such as CPR.”

Although 90 percent of parents say they supervise their children while swimming, many acknowledge that they engage in other distracting activities at the same time – talking, eating, reading or taking care of another child. In fact, a parent or caregiver claimed to be supervising the child in nearly 9 out of 10 drowning-related deaths.

While there is no substitute for active supervision, learning how to swim is an important skill for both parents and children to learn. In fact, new studies indicate that teaching children to swim between the ages of 6 and 12 months old is a great way to build their confidence in the water while at the same time teaching them water safety skills. These lessons are literally saving lives, your child will learn about water safety skills and what they should do if they fall in the pool.

In the summer months, between May and August, drowning deaths among children increase 89 percent over the rest of the year. And, home swimming pools are the most common site for a drowning to occur with a child less than 5 years of age.

To help keep your kids safe in or around the water, Safe Kids recommends these Lock, Look, and Learn reminders for parents.



Lock
If you have a pool or spa, or if your child visits a home that has a pool or spa, it should be surrounded on all four sides by a fence at least 4-feet high with self-closing and self-latching gates. Studies estimate that this type of isolation fencing could prevent 50 to 90 percent of child drownings in residential pools.

Make sure all pools and spas have compliant anti-entrapment drain covers and back up devices to ensure safer places for children to swim.

When not in use, all pools, including portable inflatable pools and spas, should be covered and secured. Ladders to above ground pools and spas should be locked or removed.


Look
Always actively supervise children in and around water. Designate someone to be the “Water Watcher” – a responsible adult who is in charge of watching children while they are in or near water. The Water Watcher should not be distracted by phone calls, text messages, reading or talking to others. Caregivers can work as a team, taking turns with another adult to stay alert to watch the children.

Watch children even if they know how to swim – knowing how to swim does not prevent drowning.

If a child is missing, check the water first.

Learn
Know how to swim and enroll your kids in swimming lessons.

Learn CPR and know how to use rescue equipment – these are important skills to know if there is an emergency.

Learn how to choose the right life jacket depending on the water activity, your child’s size, and weight. Don’t rely on inflatable swimming toys such as “water wings” and noodles; these toys should never be used in place of U.S. Coast Guard approved life jackets. Children who can’t swim well or can’t swim at all should be within your arm’s reach.

Teach children water safety rules such as never swim alone, always wear a life jacket while boating, and never swim or play near pool or spa drains.


Related Links

07/12/11 - Safe Kids USA Batting in State Farm Go To Bat Charitable Giving Program

06/28/11 - The U.S. Fire Administration and Safe Kids USA Encourage Everyone To Practice Fire Safety During Independence Day Celebrations

06/16/11 - Safe Kids and General Motors Foundation Mark 15th Anniversary of Child Passenger Safety Partnership
1301 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Suite 1000, Washington, DC 20004-1707
Phone: 202-662-0600
Fax 202-393-2072

© 2009 Safe Kids Worldwide

Summer Safety

http://www.wwlp.com/dpp/mass_appeal/family/summer-safety-tips-for-kids

Monday, May 9, 2011

Never leave children alone in or around cars, not even for a minute

Child Safety Tips


• Never leave children alone in or around cars, not even for a minute.

• If you see a child alone in a vehicle get involved. If they are hot or seem sick, get them out as quickly as possible. Call 911 or your local emergency number immediately.

• Use drive-thru services when available.

• Use your debit card to pay for gas at the pump.

For additional information about ways to keep your children safe in and around vehicles, visit http://www.kidsandcars.org/
Heat Facts

• Heatstroke occurs when a person’s temperature exceeds 104 degrees and their thermoregulatory mechanism is overwhelmed.

• A core body temperature of 107 degrees is considered lethal as cells are damaged and internal organs shut down.

• Children’s thermoregulatory systems are not as efficient as adults’ are, and their body temperatures warm at a rate three to five times faster than adults’ do.

• After 10 minutes, the temperature inside of a car is 19 degrees hotter than the outside temperature, 29 degrees hotter after 20 minutes, 34 degrees hotter after 30 minutes, 43 degrees hotter after 60 minutes and 45-50 degrees hotter after one to two hours.

• Cracking a window has little effect.

— information provided by http://ggweather.com/heat/

Wednesday, May 4, 2011

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Dorel Car Seat Recall: Full List to Keep Baby Safe




Posted by David W Freeman
Dorel's Alpha Omega Convertible Car Seat (model 22469) is one of almost 800,000 seats affected by recall.

(Credit: Dorel Juvenile Group)

(CBS) Almost 800,000 child safety seats are being recalled over concerns about a potentially dangerous problem with the locking-and-release mechanism, the National Highway Traffic Administration announced today.
The seats were made by Dorel Consumer Group between May 1, 2008 and April 30, 2009, according to the agency's website. They include infant, convertible, and booster child restraint systems marketed under brand names including Cosco, Maxi-Cosi, and Safety First. The concern is that the harness might loosen as a child moves around, raising the risk of injury in a crash.

The company said it would provide consumers with a tube of non-toxic lubricant that can be applied to the locking mechanism to ensure that it works properly, along with a label to indicate that the repair has been made.

Until the repair is made, consumers can continue to use the seats - but should make sure the lock/release button is in the locked position. A pull on the shoulder harness can help make sure it is secure and will not loosen.

For more information, contact the company at 866-623-3139 or harnessadustment@djusa.com.

Here's a list of the affected model numbers and manufacture dates, according to safercar.gov:

DJG / 17439 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22077 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22078 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22148 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22149 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22150 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22152 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22154 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22155 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22158 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22159 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22172 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22177 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22178 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22185 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22188 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22195 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22346 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22356 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22371 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22372 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22412 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22439 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22449 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22452 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22453 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22456 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22458 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22459 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22462 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22465 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22469 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22475 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22476 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22486 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22546 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22547 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22553 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22554 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22560 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22561 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22564 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22567 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22574 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22580 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22657 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22740 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22741 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22755 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22758 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22759 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22790 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22799 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / 22880 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009


DJG / IC072 MAY 01, 2008 - APR 30, 2009

YOUR ACCESS TO OPTIMAL HEALTH!

Join Us for Our Sports Safety Seminar and Clinic!



Saturday, April 23rd, 2011 from 1pm to 5pm
@ The All-Access Fitness Academy

This is a FREE Seminar – available to ALL athletes, coaches, and parents. Come learn from Sports Medicine Physicians, Physical Therapists, Athletic Trainers, and Strength Coaches on how to stay as safe as possible while participating in the sports you play!

This Free Seminar will Include Sports Medicine Lectures on Hot Topics such as -

- Supplements
- Concussions
- Sideline Injuries
- Heat Illness & Dehydration
- And more…

We will also be running Youth Injury Prevention & Fitness Training Classes;

- Learn how strength & conditioning can prevent injuries and improve performance


- Parents can train alongside their son or daughter


- Classes designed for kids of all ages - grade school to high school

We’ll also have Booths & Hands-On Demonstrations on a variety of sports safety topics! This seminar and clinic is brought to you by a grant from Safe Kids, USA (www.safekids.org).

Remember, sports safety is a team effort. Let us be part of your team and help athletes have a safe, competitive, and fun sports season!

Pre-registration for this seminar/clinic is preferred as we are expecting a large turnout.
To register, call 508-845-3974, or visit our events page at www.allaccessfa.com and register using our online form.





Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Second Infant Death Prompts; Recall to Repair

Second Infant Death Prompts Re-Announcement of Delta Enterprise "Safety Peg" Drop-Side Crib Recall to Repair: Missing Safety Pegs Create Risk of Entrapment and Suffocation


On March 22, 2011, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) re-announced a 2008 recall of more than 985,000 Delta Enterprise drop-side cribs. The CPSC recently learned of a 2009 death in which a 7-month-old girl became entrapped and suffocated between the detached drop-side and mattress of her recalled crib. The crib was purchased secondhand and re-assembled without safety pegs in the bottom tracked. The CPSC urges consumers to check their Delta cribs immediately and to STOP using cribs that are missing a safety peg on either leg of the drop side. Contact Delta to receive a no-cost, repair kit at (800) 516-5304 or visit www.cribrecallcenter.com.

Missing safety pegs can create a situation where the crib's drop-side rail disengages from the track. This can create a hazardous space in which an infant can become entrapped and suffocate. At the time of the October 2008 recall, CPSC notified consumers about the death of an 8-month-old girl who became entrapped and suffocated when the drop side of the crib detached. The crib involved in this incident also was re-assembled without safety pegs. At the time of the October 2008 recall announcement, there were reports of two entrapments and nine detachments in cribs without safety pegs.

This re-announcement involves cribs that were made in Taiwan and Indonesia. The cribs were sold at major retail stores including Kmart, Target and Walmart between January 1995 and December 2005 (through September 2007 for model 4624) for about $100.

Delta's name and address is printed on the mattress support boards and the Delta logo is on the crib's top teether rail. Model numbers are located on the top of the mattress support board. This announcement includes the following 49 crib models with "Crib Trigger Lock with Safety Peg" drop-side hardware:

4320, 4340
4500, 4520, 4530, 4532, 4540, 4542, 4550, 4551, 4580
4600, 4620, 4624 - production dates 01/06 thru 11/07, 4640, 4660, 4720, 4735, 4742, 4750 - production dates 01/95 thru 12/00
4760, 4770, 4780, 4790
4820, 4840, 4850, 4860, 4880, 4890, 4892; and
4900, 4910, 4920, 4925-2, 4925-6, 4930, 4940, 4943, 4944, 4947, 4948, 4949, 4950, 4958, 4963, 4968, 4969, 4980

For more information on Crib Safety, visit CPSC's Crib Information Center.


Monday, March 28, 2011

Palmer Ambulance Services Car Seat Check Up Event, April 9, 10-2

UP Comming Safe Kids Events

April 4th, 2011,
Public Health Month Kick-Off, City Hall (instead of the monthly meeting)
10-12 noon

April 9, 2011
Car Seat Check Palmer Ambulance Services
10-2pm

April 16, 2011
Car Seat Check, Baystate Franklin Medical Center
48 Sanderson Street, Greenfield
10am-2pm

April 25, 2011
Car Seat Check, Mason Square Fire Department
33 Eastern Ave, Springfield
11am-3pm,

April 30, 2011,
Springfield Fire Department Open House
1212 Carew Street, Springfield
10-2pm,

May 2nd, 2011
Mini Health Fair (instead of the monthly meeting)
Wal-Mart on Boston Road.
11am-1pm,

June 6, 2011,
Safe Kids Meeting
50 Maple Street
11am,

Car Seat Check Up

Car Seats Recomendations for Children


Click on image for a better view

AAP UPDATES RECOMMENDATION ON CAR SEATS

AAP UPDATES RECOMMENDATION ON CAR SEATS

Children should ride rear-facing to age 2, use a booster until at least age 8


Below is a policy appearing in the April issue of Pediatrics, the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).


For Release: Monday, March 21 , 2011 12:01 am (ET)

New advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) will change the way many parents buckle up their children for a drive.

In a new policy published in the April 2011 issue of Pediatrics (published online March 21), the AAP advises parents to keep their toddlers in rear-facing car seats until age 2, or until they reach the maximum height and weight for their seat. It also advises that most children will need to ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years of age.

The previous policy, from 2002, advised that it is safest for infants and toddlers to ride rear-facing up to the limits of the car seat, but it also cited age 12 months and 20 pounds as a minimum. As a result, many parents turned the seat to face the front of the car when their child celebrated his or her first birthday.

“Parents often look forward to transitioning from one stage to the next, but these transitions should generally be delayed until they’re necessary, when the child fully outgrows the limits for his or her current stage,” said Dennis Durbin, MD, FAAP, lead author of the policy statement and accompanying technical report.

“A rear-facing child safety seat does a better job of supporting the head, neck and spine of infants and toddlers in a crash, because it distributes the force of the collision over the entire body,” Dr. Durbin said.

“For larger children, a forward-facing seat with a harness is safer than a booster, and a belt-positioning booster seat provides better protection than a seat belt alone until the seat belt fits correctly.”
While the rate of deaths in motor vehicle crashes in children under age 16 has decreased substantially – dropping 45 percent between 1997 and 2009 – it is still the leading cause of death for children ages 4 and older. Counting children and teens up to age 21, there are more than 5,000 deaths each year. Fatalities are just the tip of the iceberg; for every fatality, roughly 18 children are hospitalized and more than 400 are injured seriously enough to require medical treatment.

New research has found children are safer in rear-facing car seats. A 2007 study in the journal Injury Prevention showed that children under age 2 are 75 percent less likely to die or be severely injured in a crash if they are riding rear-facing.

“The ‘age 2’ recommendation is not a deadline, but rather a guideline to help parents decide when to make the transition,” Dr. Durbin said. “Smaller children will benefit from remaining rear-facing longer, while other children may reach the maximum height or weight before 2 years of age.”

Children should transition from a rear-facing seat to a forward-facing seat with a harness, until they reach the maximum weight or height for that seat. Then a booster will make sure the vehicle’s lap-and-shoulder belt fit properly. The shoulder belt should lie across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not near the neck or face.

The lap belt should fit low and snug on the hips and upper thighs, not across the belly. Most children will need a booster seat until they have reached 4 feet 9 inches tall and are between 8 and 12 years old.

Children should ride in the rear of a vehicle until they are 13 years old.

Although the Federal Aviation Administration permits children under age 2 to ride on an adult’s lap on an airplane, they are best protected by riding in an age- and size-appropriate restraint.

"Children should ride properly restrained on every trip in every type of transportation, on the road or in the air,” Dr. Durbin said.

A car seat guide for parents is available at www.healthychildren.org/carseatguide

Public Health Month Calendar 2011

Click on the calendar for a better view

Friday, February 25, 2011

National Burn Awareness Week Reminds Parents to Keep Kids Safe

 Most common cause of hospitalizations from burns to children under 5 is scalds from hot liquids
 
Washington, D.C. Each year 465 children ages 14 and under die due to unintentional fire or burn related injuries, with children ages 3 and younger at the greatest risk, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

 
Pennsylvania, New York, Texas, Illinois and North Carolina are in the top five for having the most fire and burn related deaths in children ages 14 and under, according to the CDC’s latest data in 2007.

 

 Safe Kids USA reminds parents that February 6 – 12 is the American Burn Association’s National Burn Awareness Week and to take a few simple precautions to ensure their child’s safety.

 

 

 
A 2009 report from the American Burn Association indicates that the most common cause of hospitalizations to children under 5 years of age is scald burns caused by hot liquids. Hot tap water accounts for nearly 1 in 4 of all scald burns among children and is associated with more deaths and hospitalizations than any other hot liquid burns.

 
“A burn is one of the most painful injuries a child can suffer,” said Safe Kids USA’s President Meri-K Appy. “Because young children have thinner skin than adults, their skin burns more deeply and at lower temperatures — and young children often cannot react quickly enough to escape harm. A little planning and a few simple precautions can prevent devastating injuries and even save a child’s life. ”

 
According to a study in Pediatrics, of the non-tap water scalds, 90.4 percent were related to hot cooking or drinking liquids. Major causes of injury to children ages 18 months to 4 years were from hot microwave food or from when an older child, 7 to 14 years of age, was cooking or carrying the scalding substance or supervising the younger child.

 
“Parents should set their water heater thermostat to 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48 degrees Celsius) or if you are unable to control the temperature that comes out of your faucet, install water faucets and shower heads that can shut off the flow of water when it gets too hot,” said Appy.

 
Safe Kids USA reminds parents of these simple safety measures to use in the kitchen and bathroom to prevent burn injuries to their children.

 
Kitchen
  • Keep children at least 3 feet from hot appliances, pots, pans, or food.
  • Use spill-resistant mugs when drinking hot liquids around children.
  • Avoid using tablecloths or anything a child can pull and cause hot food to spill.
  • When cooking, use back burners, and turn pot handles towards the back of the stove.  
  • Always tuck appliance cords where children cannot reach them.  
  • Never hold a child when cooking something hot.
  • Stir all food and drink before serving children to make sure it is cool enough to eat and drink.
  • Closely supervise children when they are in or near the kitchen.
Bathroom
  • Always test the bath water with your hand before bathing children.
  • When children are in or near the bath, watch them closely, and check the water temperature frequently.
  • If you are unable to control the temperature that comes out of your faucet, install special water faucets or shower heads that can shut off the flow of water when it gets too hot.  

 

When to Transition to Booster Seats

One of the most important jobs you have as a parent is keeping your child safe when riding in a vehicle. Each year thousands of young children are killed or injured in car crashes. Proper use of car safety seats helps keep children safe. But with so many different car safety seats on the market, and some much information on how to use them; it’s no wonder many parents find this overwhelming. The type of seat your child needs depends on several things including your child’s size, age, maturity level and the type of vehicle you have.


Toddlers/ preschoolers and young school age are the most at risk (from 3 to 7). Although the recent passed Mass Booster Seat Law gives us a pretty good guideline for when to transition our children from booster seat to seat belt, there continues to be a need for child passenger safety awareness education. And there are too many considerations and no clear cut standard to determine when is appropriate to transition our children form a 5 pt harness to a booster seat.

Unfortunately the guidelines are not so clear on transitioning our toddlers from 5pt harness to booster seats. A few years back most car seats held children in harnesses only up to 40 pounds, at that time because of the limited choices most 40 pounds children would transition to a booster seat regardless of age and maturity. Now, recent research suggests that in many occasions’ children who are less than 4 years old, regardless of their height and weight, are not mature enough to stay bucked in position to withstand the impact of a car crash. In response to this finding, more and more manufacturers are developing and marketing a variety of Child Safety Seats that can hold a child in a 5pt harness up to 50, 60 and even 80 pounds.

The recent influx of high weigh harness child safety seats help us better transition toddlers into better seats. Having all this options, is making not necessarily making things easier for parents to chose the appropriate child safety seat for their children, but is providing them with other safety options.

If you have questions in how to choose the best child safety seat for your 3 to 7 year old child you can call us at 413 794 6510.

REMINDER... MASS BOOSTER SEAT LAW

Friday, February 4, 2011

Massachusetts Health Insurance Plans Providing Seats


Here is a list of the Mass Health Plans that currently provide their members with free car seats. We ask all Parents to first try to obtain a seat from your Health Insurance Plan. Some of these plans can take 4 to 6 weeks to send you a seat, so please do this before your child has outgrown their current seat.

Boston Medical Center HealthNet: Call the member number on the back of your card or 1-888-566-0010. BMC HealthNet currently supplies parents with a Convertible car seat only.

Fallon Community Health Plan: Contact their Customer Service to put in a request at 1-800-341-4848 (TDD/TTY: 1-877-608-7677) or email contactcustomerservice@fchp.org. for either a carseat OR a breastpump through their “Oh Baby” program – but not both.

Neighborhood Health Plan: Call the Customer Care Center at 1-800-462-5449 or 1-800-655-1761 (TTY) for more information. Receive a free convertible if you are 35 weeks or more pregnant. They also provide a free booster seat. Limit one convertible car seat and one booster seat per member up through age 7.

Network Health: Call 1-888-257-1985 or use their on-line form to request your seat. You can be eligible for a $50 one time gift card to babies r us to use towards an infant or convertible car seat. Once the child has outgrown that seat, you are eligible for an additional $25 gift card to babies r us for a booster seat. .


The American Academy of pediatrics recommends that:

Infants should ride rear-facing until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their car safety seat’s manufacturer. At a minimum, children should ride rear-facing until they have reached at least 1 year of age and weigh at least 20 pounds. When children reach the highest weight or length allowed by the manufacturer of their infant-only seat, they should continue to ride rear-facing in a convertible seat.


Toddlers/preschoolers
It is best for children to ride rear-facing as long as possible to the highest weight and height allowed by the manufacturer of their convertible seat. When they have outgrown the seat rear-facing, they should use a forward-facing seat with a full harness as long as they fit.


School-aged children
Booster seats are for older children who have outgrown their forward-facing car safety seats. Children should stay in a booster seat until adult belts fit correctly (usually when a child reaches about 4' 9" in height and is between 8 and 12 years of age).


Older children
Children who have outgrown their booster seats should ride in a lap and shoulder seat belt in the back seat until 13 years of age.


Do NOT buy a used seat at a yard sale or thrift store! You cannot verify the history of the seat. It’s ok to use a seat from a friend as long as you trust that the seat has never been in an accident, the seat does is not missing any pieces of have visual damage, the seat harness has never been submerged in water or washed with chemicals, the seat is not recalled, and the seat is not expired. It is far safer to use the convertible car seat provided by the Insurance companies than use an infant bucket with any of the issues above.

Massachusetts Health Insurance Plans Providing Seats

Here is a list of the Mass Health Plans that currently provide their members with free car seats. We ask all Parents to first try to obtain a seat from your Health Insurance Plan. Some of these plans can take 4 to 6 weeks to send you a seat, so please do this before your child has outgrown their current seat.



Boston Medical Center HealthNet: Call the member number on the back of your card or 1-888-566-0010. BMC HealthNet currently supplies parents with a Convertible car seat only.

Fallon Community Health Plan: Contact their Customer Service to put in a request at 1-800-341-4848 (TDD/TTY: 1-877-608-7677) or email contactcustomerservice@fchp.org. for either a carseat OR a breastpump through their “Oh Baby” program – but not both.
Neighborhood Health Plan: Call the Customer Care Center at 1-800-462-5449 or 1-800-655-1761 (TTY) for more information. Receive a free convertible if you are 35 weeks or more pregnant. They also provide a free booster seat. Limit one convertible car seat and one booster seat per member up through age 7.

Network Health: Call 1-888-257-1985 or use their on-line form to request your seat. You can be eligible for a $50 one time gift card to babies r us to use towards an infant or convertible car seat. Once the child has outgrown that seat, you are eligible for an additional $25 gift card to babies r us for a booster seat.  .


The ammerican Academy of pediatrics recomends that
Infants should ride rear-facing until they reach the highest weight or height allowed by their car safety seat’s manufacturer. At a minimum, children should ride rear-facing until they have reached at least 1 year of age and weigh at least 20 pounds. When children reach the highest weight or length allowed by the manufacturer of their infant-only seat, they should continue to ride rear-facing in a convertible seat.


Toddlers/preschoolers

It is best for children to ride rear-facing as long as possible to the highest weight and height allowed by the manufacturer of their convertible seat. When they have outgrown the seat rear-facing, they should use a forward-facing seat with a full harness as long as they fit.


School-aged children
Booster seats are for older children who have outgrown their forward-facing car safety seats. Children should stay in a booster seat until adult belts fit correctly (usually when a child reaches about 4' 9" in height and is between 8 and 12 years of age).



Older children
Children who have outgrown their booster seats should ride in a lap and shoulder seat belt in the back seat until 13 years of age.



Do NOT buy a used seat at a yard sale or thrift store! You cannot verify the history of the seat. It’s ok to use a seat from a friend as long as you trust that the seat has never been in an accident, the seat does is not missing any pieces of have visual damage, the seat harness has never been submerged in water or washed with chemicals, the seat is not recalled, and the seat is not expired. It is far safer to use the convertible car seat provided by the Insurance companies than use an infant bucket with any of the issues above.











Wednesday, January 26, 2011

How To Help Kids Avoid Sprts Injuries

We are a sports family. Every weekend my boys, ages 10 and 8, are involved in at least one sports related activity. So, my husband and I spend a good portion of our Saturdays and Sundays driving to games, lacing up cleats, filling up water bottles and providing encouragement regardless of the outcome of the day. As exhausting as it may be, I enjoy every minute!
(Credit: iStockphoto) By Dr. Jamie A. Freishtat



However, far too often, we (my husband is also a pediatrician) end up taking care of a child with a sports-related injury. Busy weekend schedules are inevitable, but injuries don't have to be. Of the more than 3.5 million children age 14 and under that receive medical treatment for sports injuries each year, experts say as many as half are likely preventable. We, as parents, can do a lot to reduce our children's risk of injury.

So how can kids can spend more time on the field and less time in the doctor's office? Here are a few things parents should know about:

Overuse Injuries: This type of injury occurs when there is repeated stress on a part of the musculoskeletal system (i.e., muscles, bones, tendons). Improper training such as incorrect technique, doing too much, or not using correct equipment, can lead to overuse injuries. Some examples include: tennis elbow, Little League elbow, and shin splints. Kids are particularly at risk for overuse. As parents, we need to be sure our kids take the recommended time off to rest, play no more than the developmentally and age appropriate amount, are taught proper techniques, wear the right equipment, and train correctly at all times. We must teach our kids to let us know right away if they are having any discomfort and that it's never okay to play through the pain. If there is ever any pain, have it evaluated right away by the doctor.

Concussion: A concussion is a bump, blow, or jolt to the head (or body) that can change the way the brain normally works. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics article "Sports -Related Concussion in Children and Adolescents," signs and symptoms of a concussion may include:
Headache
Feeling mentally "foggy"
Irritability
Drowsiness
Nausea
Feeling slowed down
Sadness
Sleeping more than usual
Vomiting
Difficulty concentrating
More emotional
Sleeping less than usual
Balance problems
Difficulty remembering
Nervousness
Difficulty falling asleep
Visual problems
Forgetful of recent information
Fatigue
Confused about recent events
Sensitivity to light
Answers questions slowly
Sensitivity to noise
Repeats questions
Dazed
Stunned

It's the parent's and coach's job to be sure kids wear properly fitted, well-maintained protective equipment and that the rules of the games are followed. Parents and coaches also should know that concussions can happen, and if they recognize any signs or symptoms, they must get the child to a doctor immediately.

It's the medical professional's job to manage a concussion, and to determine when it's okay for the child to start playing after a concussion. Never allow a child to return to play without the "go ahead" from the doctor. This could lead to even greater injury or even death.
Dehydration: Drinking before, during and after play is a must to prevent dehydration! Don't wait for your child to tell you he is thirsty to start offering fluids. By then he/she is already dehydrated and you're playing "catch up". We need to send our kids out to play with plenty of fluids and provide constant reminders to drink up. In general, an 85-pound child should drink about five ounces every 20 minutes, and a 130-pound child should drink about nine ounces every 20 minutes, during the activity.

Also, remember to bring your kids to their doctor for a pre-participation physical exam each year. This is recommended for all children to keep them healthy and safe.

Hopefully, by learning more about youth sports related injuries, we can all make a difference in keeping our children safe. I want my kids (and all kids) to develop a lifelong passion for being active--and safe!

For more information on preventing sports injuries visit www.safekids.org.

Jamie A. Freishtat MD, FAAP, is a board certified pediatrician and a safety advocate and blogger for Safe Kids USA, a non-profit organization dedicated to preventing unintentional childhood injury. Its new initiative on preventing youth sports injury is being supported by its founding sponsor, Johnson & Johnson. Dr. Freishtat lives in the Washington D.C. area with her husband, Rob, two sons, Nate, age 10, and Max, age 8, and their family dog, Brownie.

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504744_162-20021459-10391703.html